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The Tree at Merrion Square, Dublin, Ireland

Here's one of my favorite infrared images from Ireland. It's a weeping willow-type tree in Merrion Square Park in Dublin. I like how the branches shoot off in all kinds of directions.

Trees are fun to photograph in infrared since the green leaves become white in the image and the bark of the trunk and branches remains dark. I like to boost the contrast in Lightroom to really make the image pop.

Playing with Prisma

Lately, the iPhone has been getting a lot more use in my landscape photography.. I don't use many photo filter apps, but there's one I recently tried that's really fun to use. It's the Prisma app, which makes photos look like painted works of art by the likes of Van Gogh or Picasso. There's a lot of different options and it's fun to see how the photos look in the different styles.

This image is from an iPhone photo of a stop along the Ring of Kerry in Ireland. The original wasn't really a keeper, because of the light and uninteresting background, but I thought it might deserve a try in Prisma, and I think it turned out pretty cool.

The View from Valentia Island

Since the clouds were so dramatic on our visit to Valentia Island in southwestern Ireland, I decided this view called for an infrared image. The infrared is great for making cloud formations look even more intense.

Little FYI - Valentia was the European point for the first successfully run transatlantic telegraph cable. The other end being in Newfoundland.

The Cliffs of Moher

Though an amazingly beautiful place to visit, The Cliffs of Moher in southwestern Ireland is also a tough place to photograph well - weather, wind, a ton of tourists, but I definitely recommend a visit.

At the time I was there, it was extremely windy, so I couldn't do any long exposures, even with a sturdy tripod. There was also a lot of low cloud cover and haze over the entire area.

When I started processing my photos, I knew right away that I was going to have to push the limits of Lightroom's dehaze slider, something I hadn't tried before. I was impressed. It worked out pretty well. Maybe not well enough to make a large print, but well enough to have a nice photo from the moment. Up top is the 'after' image and here's the original photo:

What do you think?

The River Nore in Kilkenny

This is an image from the town of Kilkenny in the south-east part of Ireland. It's one of the many beautiful towns with old castles, ruins, and colorful buildings. This particular scene, with the River Nore in the foreground, the colorful buildings in the middle ground, and Kilkenny Castle in the background, created a nice sense of dimension. The leading lines to the castle also helped make the image more interesting.

Travel Photography: Ireland Trip - Include People In Your Epic Images

This image was taken at Inch Beach on the Dingle Peninsula in Ireland. It's an amazing view from the beach, with the rolling surf and the mountains off in the distance. The dramatic clouds made the scene even more intense. As beautiful as the scene was, though, the image would have looked flat without the person there on the left third. The person adds a point of interest to draw your eye to, as well as a sense of scale to a very large view. When you get the chance, try to include a person or object in your epic, wide-angle images. They might even appreciate being part of it.

Fisherman and Lines

One of my favorite images from Ko Olina on Oahu, Hawaii. This one has the subject framed by the two fishing poles in an interesting way. I could have cropped in, but I liked the lone fishing rod on the left, and it doesn't hurt to have photographic objects in sets of threes (really, it's a thing).  I also love the colors and contrast between the rocks, the water and the sky. Wish I was back there right now!